Author Archives: Danielle Downs

This Week in Collaboration

October 11th, 2013 | Posted by Danielle Downs in Industry News | Video Conferencing - (0 Comments)

This-week-in-collaboration

Welcome to our bi-weekly recap of the week’s best articles surrounding collaboration.

1. Working Smarter: The Paradigm Shift in Business Collaboration

Great insight on how individuals embracing new collaboration tools will benefit from a more innovative, efficient, and happier workforce. In contrast to past work environments, these new disruptive forces in collaboration technologies have created new strategies for companies to implement.

2. Fufulling the promise of advanced collaboration 

Although the advanced collaboration technologies emerging in our market today are increasing productivity, there have been many IT challenges along the way. One of the most difficult hurdles for implementing these tools is the lack of an open standards-based development framework.

3. Collaboration and the future of Customer Support 

Understanding the changing nature of customer support is imperative for organizations looking to increase productivity and customer approval rates. This new wave of collaborative support is strongly tied to the mobile revolution, with the addition of social options alongside traditional phone support.

4. Five tips to ace your next video conference from anywhere 

With the rise in popularity of video conferencing, particularly mobile video, these are some important tips to remember when conducting your next video call. These include practice, position, appearance, attention and mute/disconnect.

5. Web Conferencing: Need for Today’s Business World 

With the increasing mobile workforce, the need for high quality collaborative technologies is very important for productivity. Web conferencing in particular allows individuals to connect and join a meeting any time and any place.

Developing a Mobile Video Strategy Part II

October 4th, 2013 | Posted by Danielle Downs in Video Conferencing - (0 Comments)

As stated in Part 1 of this series, when choosing to deploy a mobile video strategy, having a plan of attack is of utmost importance. The first step was defining the video environment to determine what is necessary for a successful implementation. The second step in developing a mobile video strategy is to assess different aspects of the organization’s network environment. This focuses on the following key areas:

  • Office Network
  • Remote Network
  • Infrastructure
  • Platform Consideration
  • Active Directory Integration

Specifically, this means that attention needs to be paid to an office’s wireless network configuration, remote network essentials, defined software platforms, necessary infrastructure, and determination of active directory integration.

For example, it is imperative to understand potential bandwidth consumption so as to prepare the network with adequate bandwidth capacity. Implementing a mobile video strategy can cause an explosion of bandwidth usage, which can be crippling to a network if not adjusted properly. Understanding these necessary steps when preparing a network for mobile video will help to ensure an effective and successful implementation.

Download our network considerations guide to get started with planning your mobile video strategy.

Mobile Part 2 CTA

 

This Week in Collaboration

September 27th, 2013 | Posted by Danielle Downs in Industry News - (0 Comments)

This-week-in-collaboration

Welcome to our bi-weekly recap of the weeks’ best articles surrounding collaboration. 

1. Polycom Video Solutions help keep NATO personnel ready for the next crisis, diplomatic mission or humanitarian effort

Announcement around NATO’s decision to use Polycom’s RealPresence Platform as the backbone of their video collaboration environment. By utilizing video conferencing, NATO is hoping to streamline decision making and communication as well as reducing travel costs.

2. SPAR saves time and money with video conferencing

This post showcases UK based grocery chain SPAR, and how deploying video has saved the company both time and money. Their main use case was around their multiple executive meetings that they hold and how winter weather was consistently disrupting those meetings.

3. Videoconferencing Options Expand

Analysis around the growth of video conferencing and the wide range of options now available. It details options including the videoconference room, software-only model, and cloud based options.

4. Businesses look to collaborate with UC

This piece focuses on how collaboration, specifically document and screen sharing, helps to significantly increase efficiency. It speaks to both screen sharing with audio conference calls as well as collaboration with video conferencing.

5. Video Conferencing in the 21st century classroom

Video conferencing in the classroom is opening up a plethora of possibilities around collaboration. This article outlines some of those possibilities and use cases including guest lectures, professional development workshops, and virtual field trips.

Getting Started with Mobile Video Conferencing

September 24th, 2013 | Posted by Danielle Downs in Cloud Services | Video Conferencing - (0 Comments)

For companies looking to dive in to this mobile video craze, having a solid plan of attack is very important. Not only will it help determine the technology requirements, it ensures a consistent user experience for all participants involved.

The first step in developing a mobile video strategy is to define the organization’s video environment. This focuses on determining the following key areas:

  • End users
  • Video devices & applications
  • Meeting types
  • Current video equipment
  • Goals & objectives

Essentially, this means organizations should outline who will be using mobile video, what devices these participants will be connecting with, what types of meetings will be conducted, and the objectives mobile video is looking to accomplish.

For example, it is essential to ensure that the mobile devices being used can integrate with any room systems or infrastructure that is currently in place. If employees plan to use consumer applications, such as Skype or Google Video, then an additional outside bridging service will be necessary to provide interoperability to standards-based systems. Determining those use cases and goals will help to define what is necessary for effective implementation.

Read Part II of Developing a Mobile Video Strategy here.

Download the worksheet below to get started with planning your mobile video strategy.

5 Lessons I Have Learned From Telecommuting

September 20th, 2013 | Posted by Danielle Downs in Collaboration | Video Conferencing - (0 Comments)

I saw a news clip about the rise in telecommuting on CBS the other day and I echoed many of the sentiments from my fellow telecommuters. I also have a confession to make, what I looked forward to the most was the ability to wear sweatpants to the “office.” The first week or two I would go to my closet each morning grinning as I bi-passed my slacks and skirts en route to my sweatpants drawer.

However, I quickly learned that getting ready in the same way I would when going in to an office, was very important for my “workday” mindset. Now being fair, I can’t say that I put those nice slacks and skirts on everyday, but blouses paired with yoga pants was a definite step up.

That was just one lesson I have learned about effective telecommuting. Here are a few others:

Location Is Key:
Having a designated office, or at the very least a designated office area is imperative for productivity. Having a place that I can go to and close the door, is an effective way to keep outside distractions at bay. Creating a professional work environment also helps increase my self-discipline during office hours.

Visibility:
Being online and available during work hours is another component that is very important when telecommuting. Since I work for a collaboration company that means being online and available for instant messaging, phone, and video calls. This visibility and ability to have spontaneous or informal conversations also creates the feeling of being in an office.

Regular Communication:
Along with visibility, comes regular communication. Routinely speaking to colleagues on video mitigates the “social isolation” challenge that some remote employees feel. Communicating often, particularly via video conferencing, increases productivity by allowing me to brainstorm and collaborate face-to-face.

Earning Trust:
Regular communication, increased productivity, and consistent office hours all help in earning and maintaining my manager and coworkers’ trust. Mutual expectations between both a manager and remote employee, along with other team members, are essential for successful telecommuting.

Taking Breaks:
Another important lesson I have learned while telecommuting is the importance of taking breaks. Although I am not very good at putting this piece in to practice, getting out of the “office” and taking a lunch break or running an errand helps increase productivity by giving your brain a chance to relax. Plus, it helps reduce the feeling of never leaving your home.

These lessons have all helped me create a successful telecommuting strategy. Although working from home is not for everyone; many folks, including myself, have found increased productivity and an improved quality of life by being able to telecommute.