As another year comes to an end it’s time to reflect on the previous year and create new goals for the coming year. Video conferencing has become ever present, cloud services are continuing to grow and collaboration technology is becoming even cooler.  Here is a look at some of our top blog posts from 2013. We hope you enjoyed reading them as much as we enjoyed writing them!

Have a wonderful and safe New Year and we’ll see you in 2014!

What is Audio Visual Integration?
The term “audio visual integration” is used quite a bit by organizations (including IVCi!) to describe the work that they do. The term is well known within the “industry” and customers may even use the term to describe a potential project, but what does it really mean?

Collaboration for Supply Chain Management
A look into the development of Boeing’s 787 Dreamliner and how different visual collaboration technologies could have helped with their supply chain management.

Overcoming Obstacles to Telepsychiatry
With the technology used in telepsychiatry becoming more reliable, inexpensive, and ubiquitous, there has been a corresponding increase in mental health professionals who are turning to remote treatments.  However, here are five potential obstacles to telepsychiatry adoption.

What is Collaboration Infographic
We created the below infographic to highlight the many forms that collaboration can take, what some of the benefits are, where collaboration happens and the tools available.

5 Best Practices for Conducting a Video Call
Video conferencing has proven to be a great way to enhance collaboration and increase productivity. However, there are important user elements to keep in mind to ensure a successful video call. Here are 5 best practices to keep in mind.

How to Create Effective Collaborations
Collaboration is now considered an integral part of corporate innovation and success. Here are some tips to create a healthy and productive collaboration structure.

Huddle Up and Collaborate
Huddle spaces or teaming rooms are being implemented in more and more organizations. The make-up of a huddle space varies significantly across organizations, but here are a few examples of solutions we have seen.

Top 10 Video Conferencing Terms
With the rise of video conferencing popularity understanding some of these terms is imperative in choosing the right solution.  Here are 10 of the most common terms and their definitions.

Battle of the Displays: Projector vs. Flat Panel
Selecting the correct display plays an integral role in the effectiveness of a collaboration environment as the wrong type of display can provide a poor user experience.  Here is a look at some of the most popular options.

The Yahoo! Fall-Out
Ever since Marissa Mayer, CEO of Yahoo! issued her memo calling back remote workers into the office countless stories and commentaries have been written. To understand this decision; let’s take a look at the different types of collaboration that occurs within an organization on a daily basis.

Blog-Post-AV-ROOM-GRAPHIC

What is an AV Room? A place to collaborate? A place to meet with remote team members? A place to present PowerPoint slides?

While the correct answer may be all of the above; none of these functions would happen without the proper design and configuration of the space. Technology integration and the actual room environment  are essential considerations when designing an optimal meeting space. As stated by Tim Hennen, SVP of Engineering at IVCi, “An audio visual integrated room is a meld of art and science. The art is in the design of the room itself; the lighting, furniture, and the selection of the right technologies that will eventually come together. The science comes in with the building of those technology connections and making each device work together as if they were one.”

That being said, there are 4 core design and technology components that are imperative when creating an effective collaboration environment. Understanding these will also help with determining what you would like to accomplish within the room.

Video
“What do you want to see?” Video in an AV room is about the display of content, how you see meeting participants on the other side of the video call,  and how remote participants see you. The equipment associated with video includes cameras, displays, a matrix switcher, a digital video processor, and a codec.

Audio
“How do you want to hear/be heard?” Audio in an AV room is about how audio is projected in the room, how sound is sent to remote participants, and how you are heard to remote participants. Equipment for audio includes speakers, microphones, acoustic panels, and an audio control system.

Control
“How do you want to control the room?” Control in an AV room is about managing what you display, where you display it, and who is heard. The equipment involved includes a control processor and the control panel.

Lighting
“How will the room be lit properly?” Lighting in an AV room is about where the lighting is placed, where current natural light sources are located, and where you want your furniture and equipment placed. Lights, shades, and lighting placement are the essentials associated with lighting in an AV room.

Understanding how these components affect the collaboration space is as important as selecting the the technology itself. Poor lighting or acoustics impact the collaboration experience just as much as not having the right video conferencing or presentation equipment. Download a copy of our AV Buyers guide for detailed explanations of each core component in addition to some handy tips and tricks.

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The Cohen Children’s Medical Center, a part of North Shore LIJ, strongly believes that art is a crucial aspect of children’s hospitals, as it creates an optimistic and constructive environment. This kind of environment allows children to open up their imagination and begin the healing process. As a result, they implemented an interactive virtual aquarium to entertain the children who are in the pediatric emergency waiting room.

The inspiration of this theme came from Long Island’s very own ocean and shoreline to create a familiar setting for young children, making them feel more at home rather than in a hospital. A hospital environment can be scary for young children and having interactive technology that makes them more comfortable can make their stay much more enjoyable and entertaining. By interacting with the technology and creating their own underwater world within the digital aquarium, children can gain a sense of control, something they may have lost by being in a hospital.

Rather than sitting in an intimidating waiting room, children can now be entertained with the virtual aquarium, and interactive “fish tank” that allows children to create their own fish, and then launch it into the tank to swim among the other fish other children have created. The fish are virtually fed, and swim among other sea creatures, such as turtles, larger fish and live among sea coral. Fish and shells decorate the floors and walls, and the CT scan also has fish painted on it. The renovations have made the hospital more appealing to children, making them less fearful of their environment. “Years of planning went into making the new facility child-friendly. Kids almost want to be here,” said Dr. Charles Schleien, Chairman of Pediatrics, in an interview with Newsday.

IVCi was contracted by North Shore LIJ and The Rockwell Group to install the system which is made up of six LCD panels, each about 55 inches wide, creating a fifteen foot screen. Six iPads are used to control what happens on the panels and allow the children to create the fish they want. The main audio comes from two speakers located on either side of the LCD mounting frame, creating as real of an experience as possible.

See for yourself with the demonstration below!

Digital Aquarium at Cohens Childrens Medical Center – Emergency Waiting Room from labatrockwell on Vimeo.

Now that unified communications have become commonplace and popular, many meeting participants prefer to participate in meetings from their desk. In some instances, that might work well, but in-room collaboration offers benefits that completely remote meetings do not. In-room allows participants to experience non-verbal communication and other visual cues that make collaboration more effective. Participants can get up and move around and still participate in the conversation, plus larger displays make it easier to view remote participants and data sources.

Organizations also often need to share and collaborate on complex data. This includes high resolution images where granular detail is necessary, such as blueprints or products designs, as well as the ability to display and control data from multiple sources simultaneously. In these cases, desktop collaboration just doesn’t quite cut it. Much of the detail and interactivity common among complex data can get lost over the desktop, plus users typically have to choose between sharing video or sharing content.

The solution is a collaboration room designed to support telepresence capabilities and complex data equally. A few application and teams that can benefits from these types of rooms include:

Research Teams: Participants need to view multiple images and different types of research data while on a video call.
Crisis Management: War Rooms that need multiple, high resolution video feeds to stay on top of the situation as well as collaborate with remote colleagues and teams.
Product Management & Development: Ability to view large, high-resolution design images along with 360-design previews

Cyviz is a manufacturer of a range of Collaboration Telepresence (CTP) products that support complex data and aims to bring the three essentials of modern meetings into alignment: video conferencing, data, and visualization. What’s also unique and valuable about Cyviz’s products is they’re all part of a cohesive portfolio designed to work together, depending on the end user’s needs. The 7 components are:

  1. Displaywall: 5 models available
  2. User Interface: Cyviz Display Controller central room control
  3. CTP Engine: for data management; 3 models available
  4. Video Codec: for standard C1 set-up
  5. Integration Kit: all the accessories needed to put the system together
  6. Collaboration Platform: enabling multi-room connection capabilities
  7. Furniture Module: ergonomically designed unit for each product

The product range is broad enough for most CTP situations, and their products are very adaptable and user-friendly. If you’re in need of a high-quality data visual data and conference solution get in touch and we will walk you through the options to ensure you’ll collaborate efficiently and not miss a byte of crucial information.

In collaboration environments there is often the need to display different types of content. Selecting the correct display plays an integral role in the effectiveness of a collaboration environment as the wrong type of display can provide a poor user experience. For example, if the display is too small for the room, participants will have a difficult time seeing the content.

The two main types of displays are flat panel displays and projection systems and there are several factors to consider when selecting a display. This includes the size of the room, the application and type of content being displayed, room aesthetics (amount and type of lighting), the budget and overall user expectations.

The size of the room has a direct correlation to the size of the display; larger spaces will need a larger display while smaller spaces can used a smaller display. Flat panel display sizes typically range anywhere from 42” to 90” diagonal but can go to 103” while projector screen sizes typically range from 119″-133″ diagonal and up.

Projection Systems:
Projectors are great for sharing text, spreadsheets or presentations as projectors can provide a larger image at a lower price point. Projection screens can also be hidden in the ceiling when they are not in use. However, projectors require low-lit or dim spaces as room light from bulbs and windows can wash out the image on the screen. Projection systems are either rear project or front projection systems.

In rear projection implementation, a projector is placed in a projection room and the image is bounced off a series of mirrors on the projection screen. This allows the projector to remain hidden, eliminating any projector noise and is also less sensitive to ambient lighting. However, collaboration rooms must be large enough to accommodate a projection room. In front projection implementation, the projector is hung from the ceiling or hidden in a drop down platform and the image is projected directly onto the front of the screen. While this setup eliminates the need for a control room, it is more susceptible to ambient light and does not hide projector noise.

Flat Panel Displays:
Flat panel displays are typically used for video conferencing as well as presentations. Flat screens offer a clear, vivid picture which is ideal for high resolution images. They are not as susceptible to ambient light; however, for an optimal experience organizations may still want to cover windows if there is a substantial amount of direct natural light coming into the room to prevent a glare. There are three types of flat panel displays including plasma, liquid crystal display (LCD) and light emitting diode (LED).

Plasma displays use gas to excite light photons which produce color on the screen. They provide the highest and most accurate representation of color and a consistent brightness to the image which can be important when displaying images or other content. However, plasmas are typically heavier, not as bright and consume more energy than other types of displays.

LCD displays use pixels that contain three colors (red, green and blue) plus a backlight. The liquid crystals, when energized, block certain colors from showing and produce the desired color. LCD displays are lighter and consumer less energy than plasmas and are typically at a lower price point.

LED displays are similar to LCD displays and use a cluster of red, green and blue diodes that are driven together for form a full color pixel. LED displays are the lightest and most energy efficient of flat panel displays. They are also brighter and provide a more accurate color than LCD; however, they are at the highest price point.

When faced with a display decision, it is important to understand how and where the equipment will be used along with the budget requirements. While a 103” plasma display might provide a lifelike experience; it is not the most affordable solution. An organization must consider the application and types of content being displayed to determine the right type of display technology.

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