Veterans returning from Iraq and Afghanistan with post-traumatic stress disorder, brain injuries and other serious mental health issues are not receiving the help they need due to insufficient access to care, according to a recent article in the New York Times.  One way this problem is being addressed: telehealth solutions that utilize video conferencing technology.

More here:

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/10/25/opinion/while-veterans-wait.html?_r=1&scp=1&sq=video%20conferencing&st=cse

 

Davis Memorial Hospital soon will offer more advanced care to stroke patients.

Neurologists from West Virginia University’s Stroke Center will communicate with the hospital using video conferencing devices.

The team will be able to view, and interact with patients while viewing diagnostic data. Hospital officials said they’re excited about the partnership.

The hospital will conduct mock drills, and that it expects the devices to go online next month.

Watch video here:

http://www.wboy.com/story.cfm?func=viewstory&storyid=109008&catid=36

 

 

A video conference on Sept. 9 linked youth voices from the United States, Lebanon, India and the United Kingdom. Small children when the attacks occurred in 2001, the participants are now high school and college students actively engaged in seeking understanding and respect across faiths, beliefs and cultures.

This was not a one-off event. All of the participating schools are part of a new initiative called “Face to Faith” — an international schools program sponsored by the Tony Blair Faith Foundation currently active in more than 400 schools in 17 nations. Through video conferencing and online community, students ages 12-17 communicate directly with their peers around the world. They are able to address issues of global concern through civil dialogue with one another about their beliefs, values, attitudes and faiths.

More here:

http://www.firstamendmentcenter.org/beyond-911-horror-voices-for-the-future

 

We have seen the benefits of video conferencing technology for patients who live in remote areas – the ability to gain instant access to specialists and medical professionals located across the country. In times of medical emergency, video can be the difference between life and death. Doctors can use video to treat stroke patients during the short window after a stroke when it is crucial to be evaluated for a life-saving treatment.

Learn more:

http://www.computerweekly.com/Articles/2011/09/08/247840/Doctors-use-HD-video-conferencing-in-rapid-remote-treatment-for-stroke.htm

 

According to AVInteractive:  The education and research sector reports that 86% of organizations expect to see significant growth in usage. Use is widespread across the sector but could be more frequent. There are high levels of internal use within organizations. Cost and time savings are considered most important benefits.

Looking forward, 86% of respondents predicted that the use of video conferencing would increase within their organization due to a combination of improvements in video conferencing technology and a wider drive to reduce organisational costs.

More here:

http://www.avinteractive.co.uk/news/33779/good-news-for-vcon