Driving Usage & Adoption

In a world where instant messaging, email and online audio meetings reign supreme; shifting an organization’s culture to adopt visual collaboration or unified communication solutions can be extremely challenging.  Implementing a new technology is a significant organizational change that, if underestimated, can produce disappointing results.  There are several key steps an organization must take in order to effectively drive adoption throughout the organization. This is the final post in a five-part series covering the successful development of a video culture within an organization.  Read part one here 

The business world is moving at a faster pace than ever before and organizations need to continually adapt in order to survive.  Visual collaboration plays an integral role in allowing organizations to make fast, fluid and flexible decisions; however, simply implementing the technology will not produce the results most organizations hope for. 

Senior management must continue to drive adoption of visual collaboration; starting with their own usage and adoption.  Managers should push the use of visual collaboration anytime the solution is available; such as board meetings or companywide video updates. 

Organizations should also map usage of visual collaboration solutions to business unit profitability.  This allows for visibility into the most effective uses of video; and often times, organizations will see increased profitability and innovation among units with the highest use. Usage mapping also provides the data needed to develop benchmarks for usage and performance.  Management can use this information to identify areas for improvement or additional business units that may benefit from the deployment of visual collaboration solutions. 

In addition to usage mapping, organizations should review overall reporting and usage metrics.  Advanced reporting can provide insight into trends that would typically be missed; such as, a decrease in the usage of a particular outdated system or specific times when video usage peaks creating an over demand on the organization’s network.  As a result, organizations can proactively address any issues to ensure they receive the most out of their video investment. 

Finally, senior management should evaluate the overall success of the visual collaboration implementation.  Questions such as were key metrics and goals achieved; were users accepting of the technology and where are the areas for improvement; should all be discussed.  Not only will this help in deploying visual collaboration to other business units; it will help the organization understand how to implement major organizational changes in the future.

This post is part of a five-part series covering the successful development of a video culture within an organization.

Part One: Because the boss said so is not enough!
Part Two: It’s more than just bits and bytes
Part Three: P is for Process, that’s good enough for me
Part Four: Power to the People

It’s Friday, you’re sitting at work and realize this Sunday is Mother’s Day.  You forgot to get a card but no big deal you’ll swing by the store on your way home tonight.  Only problem is, your mom lives 1200 miles away.   Not exactly within driving distance and, short of overnighting a card (which will be totally obvious you forgot), there is no way a card will get there on time.

Alright Plan B.  You’ll order some flowers and have them delivered on Sunday, but that just seems so…generic.  I mean this woman raised you and, more importantly, put up with you during those rebellious years.

So, how can you let your mom know just how awesome she is without purchasing the moon?

Then it hits you.

Plan C – VIDEO!  You installed Skype on her computer the last time you were in town.  Your dad is pretty technical savvy and he can make sure it’s set up properly.  So you call your dad to scheme and, all of a sudden, the most amazing plan emerges.   You’re going to deliver the flowers “in person.”

Step 1: Dad is going to head off the delivery guy and sneak the flowers into the office.
Step 2: You connect the video call with Dad while your spouse rallies the troops.
Step 3: Cram everyone in front of the webcam while Dad gets Mom.
Step 4: Mom walks into the room and you all shout HAPPY MOTHER’S DAY!
Step 5: Mom is so overwhelmed she starts crying tears of joy saying this is the best present she ever received.
Step 6: You and Dad make eye contact and celebrate with a little smile and wink.

Yes, the plan is all starting to come together.  This is going to be the best Mother’s Day by far because, let’s face it, your mom is awesome and she deserves the best of the best!

The social era has had a dramatic impact on the way customers purchase and companies promote their products.  Customer feedback is becoming ever important and now is critical to an organization’s long term success.  We’ve seen many organizations stray farther and farther away from customer needs as they fail to adapt to the changing competitive landscape.  So how can companies ensure they stay in touch with customer needs and ahead of future competitors?

Simple:  Listen to your customers and then listen some more.

Your best customers are a great source of information.  Account representatives and sales managers and even marketing managers should pause before focusing on the next sale and examine customer satisfaction.  Start by asking why your customers selected your organization and what the major benefits are.  Then distinguish if there are any products or services that are unavailable but would make their job easier.   Above all, organizations need to ensure their products and services are perfectly aligned with their customers’ needs.   If there is any doubt, it’s time to hit the drawing board.

Customers love to share their thoughts and options; but often times, they are hesitant because they are unsure how their feedback will be received or if it will simply fall upon deaf ears.   Connecting over video not only shows the customer you are interested in what they have to say, but the face-to-face interaction helps establish trust.   With trust, comes more candid feedback that could potentially reveal a product flaw or, even better, an untapped market need.

As the saying goes, the only constant in life is change itself and organizations need to stay flexible in order to survive. Collaborating with customers not only provides visibility into future trends but helps create a sustainable competitive advantage.  Technological advances now make it possible to connect to any customer with a webcam; so pick up the camera and give your customers a video call.

Power to the People! 

In a world where instant messaging, email and online audio meetings reign supreme; shifting an organization’s culture to adopt visual collaboration or unified communication solutions can be extremely challenging.  Implementing a new technology is a significant organizational change that, if underestimated, can produce disappointing results.  There are several key steps an organization must take in order to effectively drive adoption throughout the organization – including proper communication and training. This is the fourth post in a five-part series covering the successful development of a video culture within an organization.  Read part one here.

People are inherently resistant to any major change; they take comfort in the status quo because of fear associated with the uncertainty of something new.  A major organizational change, such as the implementation of a visual collaboration solution, changes the way colleagues interact with each other and perform their daily tasks.  This shift in the daily routine moves users out of their comfort zone by expecting them to learn something new; which if not addressed, can produce significant resistance. 

It is imperative for senior management to address the impact that visual collaboration has on their employees.  Frequent and open communications regarding the reasons for change and expected benefits for both the organization and the end user are a necessity. If organizations do not address the uncertainty around a new technology the resulting resistance can be insurmountable, leading to an abandoned solution. 

Those familiar with video conferencing applications, such as Skype or Face Time, are more apt to accept enterprise video than people who have never used video before.  Many people take comfort in security of email and phone calls because others cannot read their facial expressions.  Therefore, new users can initially become overwhelmed by the face-to-face exposure video provides.  Proper training along with open dialogue can help address some of the uncertainty associated with switching to video communications.  Training should include several different topics; such as operational procedures, best practices and video etiquette. 

While most users understand basic functionality of video equipment; they lack the expertise to manage the infrastructure required for effective visual collaboration.  A team of video professionals, who operate the back-end video environment and provide technical support when needed, is crucial to any video environment.  Advanced video operators should proactively monitor video meetings to allow participants to focus on the matters at hand rather than the collaboration technology.  Therefore, organizations must either locate the right technical support staff or partner with a video services provider for access to advanced technical support. 

This post is part of a five-part series covering the successful development of a video culture within an organization.

Part One: Because the boss said so is not enough!
Part Two: It’s more than just bits and bytes
Part Three: P is for Process, that’s good enough for me
Part Five: Driving Usage & Adoption

You’re thinking of investing in a visual collaboration solution or upgrading the existing deployment; however, the equipment and management costs are adding up quickly. 

While you know the value visual communication provides; you need to justify the expense to your boss.  Unfortunately, all the different components are making it difficult to show a return on investment.  

Enter the cloud.  

Organizations can have access to multi-point bridging, firewall traversal, recording and streaming features without the complicated, not to mention costly, equipment.  This eliminates the frustrating “figure it out” period and enables organizations to realize the ROI of their video investment almost instantaneously. 

Additionally, instead of a significant upfront investment in network and equipment; organizations can spread out the operation costs through monthly expenses.  Not only does this allow organizations to budget more effectively; it shifts the video investment from a capital expenditure to an operating expenditure.   As a result, organizations can fully deduct the costs in the period they are incurred instead of having to worry about depreciation. 

Start realizing the benefits of your video investment by saying goodbye to upfront capital investments and hello to manageable monthly payments! 

Similar Articles:

Why Take Video to the Cloud?