The technology is finally here to make a dispersed workforce feel connected even when miles apart, according to a recent article in Forbes.com. High  definitionvideo conferencing at the desk top is now capable of making people feel connected, even if they work on projects without ever meeting their colleagues face-to-face.

According to the article, the following are some compelling ways video is changing work habits and practices, and uniting a disparate workforce:

Teamwork and more effective meetings.
It might seem obvious, but video can fundamentally change the nature of virtual teamwork and contribute to the effectiveness of meetings. I have noticed in my meetings that the pure act of seeing and being seen raises our level of engagement, responsiveness and ownership, which ultimately leads to effective meetings.

•Managing people
This is probably the biggest challenge posed by the dispersed workforce. It’s tough managing employees that you never see. Sure, they do their work, but how do you help them on their career path, ensure they feel like a valued member of the team and handle any potentially sensitive discussions? Right now, remote workers are often relegated to being ‘individual contributors’ rather than team members or leaders. Video has the potential to change that, adding the element of nuance that is lacking in phone calls, and leveling the playing field between those in the office and those not.

•Teamsourcing
Our notion of teams and teamwork is already being challenged and will continue to become more and more dynamic. Instead of static teams that work together day in, day out, we’ll bring together groups of people that are experts in their field for specific projects. Those people might be employees, but they might also be consultants or contractors, and they could be based anywhere in the world. They’ll work together for as long as the project requires, and then go their separate ways.  They will probably never meet in person. This new form of team will only work if we find a way to inject the H Factor, and video will be absolutely crucial here.  Without the engagement and commitment it brings, things could disintegrate pretty quickly.

•Training
The importance of training in a dispersed organization cannot be underestimated. It’s the company’s primary opportunity to ensure that everyone feels part of one organization, understands all processes and is equipped to be an ambassador.  Many companies still choose to fly people in for their initial induction, but that just won’t be practicable when the majority of employees are scattered around the country and the globe.  Video will fill the gap here, perhaps becoming the main mode of training for important sessions.

•Recruitment
Have you ever hired someone without meeting them face to face? You will. It’s a certainty that at some point in the future, it will become untenable to physically meet every person we hire. Video interviews will become standard practice and will ultimately replace in-person interviews in some cases. Access to high-quality video on the desktop will play a vital role here in enabling interviewers to gauge the reaction of the interviewee and to establish a rapport.

In sum, the adoption of video across all employees is a pivotal point in how companies operate and how people work together.  Whether we know it or not, a revolution is taking place in the way we work as global economics and the pace of business dictate a more dispersed workforce.  We could view this as a challenge, or as an opportunity. Easily available and deployable high-definition desktop video might just be the key that lets us unlock all the benefits, and mitigate any potential downsides, of new virtual workstyles for all employees, not just the C-suite.

http://blogs.forbes.com/ciocentral/?p=2510

IVCi has just announced that we have earned the TelePresence Video Master Authorized Technology Provider (ATP) partner status from Cisco! This is a huge achievement for IVCi because it represents years of hard work and a significant investment in resources to gain the expertise necessary to meet Cisco’s rigorous requirements for the ATP status.

Cisco now officially recognizes IVCi as having fulfilled the training requirements and program prerequisites to sell, deploy and support Cisco TelePresence video products and solutions at the Master level. In addition, IVCi brings to the table our unique ability to provide custom telepresence solutions to all of our customers, including GE and Duke University.

Read more here:

http://www.ivci.com/ivci-recognized-as-cisco-telepresence-video-master-authorized-technology-provider-atp-partner.html

The benefits of telepsychiatry have been recognized since the 1960s when Dr. Thomas F. Dwyer, a Massachusetts psychiatrist, predicted video conferencing’s ability to facilitate the treatment of patients. Of course, the technology has come a long way since then and video conferencing is now used in a wide range of health care scenarios including mental health treatment. A recent article in the New York Times discusses how anxious and depressed patients can benefit from therapy without leaving their homes.

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/07/10/technology/bringing-therapists-to-patients-via-the-web.html?_r=1&scp=5&sq=video%20conferencing&st=cse

 

If your business is small or mid-sized and you are looking for the perfect video conferencing solution, Polycom has just come out with a system that could be the perfect fit for your organization! The Polycom RealPresence Ready is an affordable, easy-to-use video collaboration solution that is actually a bundle of high quailty Polycom products specially designed for the needs of smaller businesses.

http://www.itbusinessedge.com/cm/blogs/mah/polycom-unveils-new-videoconferencing-product-for-smbs/?cs=47905

 

The US government is the world’s largest cosumer of information technology. Now the government is taking steps to cut waste and become more effecient.

CIO of the United States Vivek Kundra said “An interesting case study is what the Social Security Administration is doing with videoconferencing. People don’t have to drive down to a Social Security office — they’re doing it through videoconferencing. The General Services Administration recently moved to Google Apps, and part of what they’re going to be doing is using the consumer tools to do video online instead of building these massive brick-and-mortar platforms.”

http://money.cnn.com/2011/07/13/news/companies/vivek_kundra_leadership.fortune/