The benefits of video conferencing are undeniable and technological innovations have made video more accessible and easier to use than ever. Unfortunately, some organizations are finding it difficult to drive usage and adoption of these solutions among their workforce.

We created the below infographic to illustrate some of the key elements of an integrated approach to adoption. This not only ensures more users will embrace the technology but it will also make achieving a great ROI possible.

To dig deeper and to understand some of the best practices and key areas to consider, download the whitepaper as well.

AdoptionWhitepaper

Cloud VIdeo Experience

Today IVCi is incredibly excited to reveal our newest service, Cloud Video Experience (CVE). This new offering is a subscription based, Infrastructure as a Service (IaaS) offering that makes large scale and rapid deployment of video conferencing not only possible but extremely easy. CVE was built to address the key challenges organizations face with video conferencing implementations including:

1. Infrastructure – CVE provides cloud based infrastructure that supports video conferencing endpoint registration, the ability to assign a standard name to your video device (name@domain.com) as well as a global directory and B2B calling.

2. Scalability – All CVE devices and software clients are auto-configured with the click of a link in an email. There is no need to provision additional infrastructure or licenses, it all happens seamlessly.

3. Mobility – Personal Video Accounts, a key feature of CVE, allow users to easily video enable laptops, tablets, and smartphones with full video conferencing capability. These users are able to connect with other users seamlessly.

4. Interoperability – Virtual Meeting Rooms enable multiple users to meet in one “meeting space” in the cloud. These rooms support standard video conferencing systems as well as Microsoft Lync and WebRTC. And for those users who don’t have access to a device with a camera, the Virtual Meeting Rooms support standard audio dial-in.

Video conferencing continues to grow in usage and popularity and CVE is designed to make it easy for organizations of any size to experience the power of visual collaboration.

Here is some additional detail about CVE:

This-week-in-collaboration

Welcome to our bi-weekly recap of the week’s best articles surrounding collaboration.

1. 5 Ways to Untether From the Desk With Video Conferencing 

Using video conferencing to be able to get away from your desk but still stay connected takes some of the stress out of this busy holiday season. Video conferencing can make sure you stay connected, maintain your presence, and meet on the go.

2. Time to Pledge Allegiance to Telework 

March 3-7, 2014 federal employees will be asked to stay at home by their agencies and not come in to the office. This is part of Telework Week, the Mobile Work Exchange’s annual global initiative that encourages governments to pledge to telework.

3. San Antonio License Plate Readers and Video Conferencing Resolve Overdue Traffic Tickets 

Video conferencing improves overdue ticket collection in San Antonio. When officers pull over drivers who have arrest warrants due to unpaid tickets, the offenders can speak with a judge immediately via video conferencing and settle the issue remotely.

4. How Web Conferencing Benefits Employee Training

The use of video conferencing for employee training is becoming more prevalent because it lowers costs to employers, provides a solid training foundation for employees, and makes training of current employees seamless.

5. Establishing Open Lines of Communication is Worth the Investment

Successful businesses rely on the technology solutions that foster collaboration on the go. Have the ability to stay connected from wherever employees are equates to a happier workforce, which often leads to happier customers.

American Telemedicine Association’s policy duo Jonathan Linkous, CEO and Gary Capistrant, Senior Director of Public Policy, return with updates and new information regarding telemedicine.

Congress
There are currently 30 plus proposed bills before Congress and 2013 has been one of the biggest years for telehealth legislation. The most notable is the Harper Bill which has been previously discussed; the biggest emphasis is getting this bill to the Congressional Budget Office so they can provide their estimate as to the cost savings this bill provides.

Telestroke is a major component which Linkous says can help revolutionize stroke care. Last year over 100,000 people who had a stroke were seen in an ER remotely by a neurologist. While he can’t be sure how many lives were saved, he guesses it was a significant percentage. Unfortunately, the savings associated with telestroke are not necessarily while patients are in the hospital. They come after patients have been discharged since they don’t have to go to rehab or go to the nursing home as much. This presents a challenge for the Congressional Budget Office to quantify the savings of the Harper Bill.

Another bill introduced is Peters H.R. 3507 for TRICARE and all of Veterans Affairs (CHAMPVA). Essentially, it will establish parity coverage for teleheath and it will also make one state license all that’s necessary for physicians to practice via telehealth. Other bills include the Step Act (H.R. 1832), VETS Act, H.R. 2001 and the TELE-MED Act, H.R. 3077 which also support the requirement for only one state license necessary to practice telehealth.

State Activity
A major topic is dealing with internet prescriptions or the ability to prescribe medication without actually seeing a patient in person. There are several state professional regulations and state medical boards that have different rules regarding licensing, standard of care and scope of practice. Since there are so many different ways states are handling this topic the ATA is working on developing a set of guidelines.

Guidelines
ATA is currently working on a series of guidelines and telehealth best practices for remote ICU, burns and wounds, and primary and urgent care. They are currently awaiting review and approval from the Board and should be available in the next few months.

As the times change, the interview process is changing as well. In this case we are talking about video conferencing. Although video conference interviews have not completely replaced face to face interviewing, they are often done at a very important point in the interview process; the first impression. This first impression will help to determine if candidates are an initial good fit for the position or not. As important as it is for the candidate to make a good first impression, it is also very important for you and your organization to come across in a positive and professional manner.

Video interviews can be as effective as an in-person interview but it is very important to understand how the process works so you can conduct these conversations as productively as possible. Here are 10 tips for conducting a high quality video interview.

1. Set Expectations: At the beginning of the interview make sure the interviewee understands the goal of the call and what you would like to get accomplished. Understanding what will take place right from the start will help to ease any jitters the candidate might have with this form of interview.

2. Make interviewee comfortable: In addition to setting expectations up front, do your best to make them feel welcome and comfortable. In most cases the interviewee will become more comfortable as the interview goes on so allow plenty of time. This will also help to avoid any rushing in case of technology issues.

3. Shut off all other technologies: Make sure you turn off all other technology to ensure you are not distracted while interviewing the participant. Hearing email or instant message notifications is not only distracting to you but can be very distracting for the interviewee.

4. Talk Slowly: Video calls can speed up the pace of your words so make sure you take your time when speaking to the interviewee. Sometimes connections can get choppy as well so if that starts to occur make sure to speak slower and repeat when necessary if you are having connection problems.

5. Have high quality equipment: During a video interview, the interviewee should have a high quality picture of you and your team. Try to avoid connecting via wireless for quality purposes and make sure you have a high quality microphone to ensure good audio quality.

6. Keep a clean presentation area: Have a clutter free, well lit area to conduct the interview, just as you would expect the participant to have. Make sure you are facing the camera at an appropriate angle, as this will create a more engaging experience for the participant.

7. Maintain good personal presentation: Along the lines of a clean presentation area, you should also have good personal presentation and conduct. Dress as if you were conducting a face to face interview and present yourself over video in a natural way.

8. Provide instructions ahead of time: Send both interview materials as well as any technology best practices or log-in information in advance to make the interviewee more comfortable and to help avoid any issues ahead of time.

9. Be patient: Understand that not all people are comfortable with technology and some candidates may stumble at first when participating in a video interview. Along the same lines, it is important to realize that technical glitches do happen so try to make the interviewee comfortable if they do.

10. Deliver a virtual handshake: Due to the inability to give a real handshake in a video interview, it is important to deliver a thought out sign off statement indicating that the interview is over. This can be as simple as a “thank you, we will speak soon.”