Healthcare reform is quickly changing the face of medicine. With so many changes in regulations and insurance, the ability to not only deliver the highest quality of care, but doing so in the most efficient manner possible, is now more important then ever.  Collaborative care is transforming how patients are treated through the continuum of care.

Join IVCi and Polycom on Wednesday, December 11 at 2:00 PM Eastern for an informative webinar covering the power of collaboration in the delivery of healthcare.

In this session you will learn:

  • How Accountable Care Organizations (ACO) are redefining care coordination.
  • The role visual collaboration can play in EHR roll-outs.
  • Reduce unnecessary readmissions through better collaboration.
  • What grant funding sources are available to drive these initiatives.

Space is limited so reserve your spot today!

Collaboration Trends in Health Care Delivery
[Click here to Register]
Date: Thursday, September 20, 2012
Time: 2:00 PM Eastern / 11:00 AM Pacific (US)

register

This-week-in-collaboration

Welcome to our bi-weekly recap of the week’s best articles surrounding collaboration.

1. Telework rapidly gains momentum but are businesses managing the risks

The increase in telework has been rapidly changing the dynamics of the workplace and employees are reaping the rewards that telework provides. These benefits include  reduced office costs, reduced staff turnover, greater work/life balance, and increased productivity. However, because work health and safety legislation apply to home-based working as well as office based work, companies considering telework arrangements need to make sure they implement appropriate guidelines and policies to minimize risks and ensure a safe workforce.

2. The technology that helps band kids in rural Nebraska unlock their potential

For music students in rural areas, getting specialized training can be very difficult due to lack of teachers and resources. In response to this, Nebraska has started using video conferencing to link students with instructors at the Manhattan School of Music in New York. Leveraging video conferencing has allowed music to stay alive in these rural Nebraska towns.

3. How OHSU used telemedicine to save a baby’s life

When a baby came down with a difficult to diagnose virus, a physician at Columbia Memorial Hospital in Astoria, called for a telemedicine consultation with Oregon Health & Science University pediatric intensivist. The doctor examined the child via a two way communication system with a robot like device at the patients end and a telemedicine computer workstation on the OHSU end. They were able to determine the baby had a life threatening bacterial infection that required immediate attention.

4. Cisco unveils mobile enhancements to collaboration suite 

As telework and mobile work forces continue to mature and increase across the country, technology companies are racing to supply these modern workers with the tools they need to get the job done. Cisco has announced several new solutions at it’s collaboration summit last month. Some of those include the new Cisco Gateway, the Jabber Guest feature, and several new communication endpoint technologies and products.

5. Videoconference meetings can boost business relationships and productivity 

94% of people believe that face-to-face communications improve business relationships, according to a survey released by Blue Jeans Network. The survey also found that talking to a person’s face is vital to avoiding preconceptions. These significant statistics continue to prove the effectiveness of video conferencing as a corporate communications tool.

The use of video conferencing continues to grow as many companies note the numerous benefits that the technology provides. However, making the initial decision to invest in video can be a difficult one. Many executives wonder whether video is truly a necessity or if it’s just a nice to have communications platform. Do the benefits of the technology really outweigh the cost of the technology?

While there are several things to remember when incorporating video conferencing into a business, here are a few key questions to ask when getting started.

Do I really need this technology?
Many companies initially question the idea of implementing video conferencing. Why change what isn’t broken; especially in well established companies that have proven processes in place. Video conferencing can augment many of those proven processes and connect internal members of the organization to suppliers and customers. Increased communication can provide numerous efficiencies and cost reductions along with higher customer satisfaction and retention. Therefore, while video conferencing may not initially seem necessary, it can quickly become an invaluable tool within an organization.

Does it affect my company in a positive way?
While it’s necessary to look at how video conferencing will impact the entire organization, it is also important to first look at how it will impact the work of the individuals who will be using it most often. The goal of visual collaboration is to allow for easier communication among team members. If everyone is two steps away from each other in an office, video may not that important. However, there are many different ways video can be integrated into an organization including conducting initial interviews and providing customer support over video instead of the phone.

Am I going to benefit financially?
Video collaboration has allowed companies to hold meetings and discuss ideas remotely while significantly reducing travel costs and other unnecessary expenditures. For organizations that have several offices, video can increase productivity by reducing the need for travel.  Instead of spending hours flying across several states or even 20-30 minutes driving across town, teams can get down to business and make decisions faster than ever before. All of this translates into reduced costs and a solid ROI for video conferencing.

How do I select the right technology?
After you’ve made the decision to invest in video, sifting through the different technology options can be overwhelming. A VAR or systems integrator can help determine your organizations needs then offer recommendations as to which technology best fits the organization’s overarching goals and budgetary requirements. It is important to select a partner that has experience and expertise in designing and implementing different visual collaboration solutions and environments.

Is everyone on board with using video?
If the executive team isn’t using video, then how important is the technology to the company? Management needs to believe in the technology otherwise driving usage and adoption throughout the organization is going to be extremely difficult. Additionally, it is important to communicate the reason for the investment, as well as, the expected benefits to individuals who will be using the technology.

Every company is unique and similar decisions can produce different results across organizations. Video conferencing however, seems to be a common factor among highly successful companies and the continued use of the technology provides many efficiencies that increase the bottom line. So if your company doesn’t have video conferencing yet, go ahead and take a leap of faith, the results may surprise you!

 

Video interviewing has been consistently gaining traction with hiring managers and recruiters over the last few years due to the time savings and the ability to cut down on travel expenses. Video interviews also give companies insights they would not be able to get over the phone or when reviewing a paper resume including body language and personality.

That being said, video interviews can seem very daunting to anyone unfamiliar or uncomfortable using video conferencing technology. With the prevalence of video interviewing growing rapidly it is essential to understand both the technology and the etiquette in order to make the best impression.

Here are 10 tips for both preparing and conducting your video interview.

  1. Choose a Quiet and Clean Surrounding:  Make sure you set yourself up with a simple neutral background. Elaborate backdrops can be very distracting. Choose a place that has little to no noise and where you will not have people distracting you or the interviewer.
  2. Be Aware Background Noise: The microphone picks up all noises so avoid typing, shuffling papers, or tapping your pen while on the video call.
  3. Make Eye Contact: Look directly in to the camera. You want to make eye contact with the interviewer and that means looking in to the camera, not at the screen or the picture-in-picture screen of yourself.
  4. Use the Picture-in-Picture Feature: Although you should look directly in to the camera for making eye contact, having the PiP feature enabled will help to make sure you appear professionally to the interviewer. Just make sure you only glance at it once in a while.
  5. Dress Professionally: You need to look your best on camera. Dress as if you would for an in-person interview. Solid colors tend to come across best on video, and you should avoid patterns and white as they tend to be distracting or will wash you out.
  6. Practice Makes Perfect: If possible do a video run through with a friend before the interview. Practice answering questions over video and get feedback on your demeanor. Also, take note of your appearance over video and ask your friend to let you know of any thing you were doing that might be distracting.
  7. Good Posture: Sit up straight and try not to slouch, fidget, or look away from the camera. It is very important to show you are engaged, as it is much easier to appear uninterested when over video. Act as if you were in the interviewers office.
  8. Close Other Programs on Your Computer: Notifications from instant messaging programs or social media are both distracting and look unprofessional. Also, too many open programs on your computer can slow your computer speed which can reduce your video quality.
  9. Use Notes: One of the benefits of a video interview is that you can have notes. Notes are ok but make them short, easy to scan, and position them in front of you so that when you refer to them you aren’t looking down.
  10. Test your audio and video: Prior to your interview test your video and audio quality and resolve any technical issues that arise. This will help to alleviate any problems when the interview starts which can be both flustering to the interviewee and take away from the time of the interview if it is on a strict time schedule.

 

Blog-Post-AV-ROOM-GRAPHIC

What is an AV Room? A place to collaborate? A place to meet with remote team members? A place to present PowerPoint slides?

While the correct answer may be all of the above; none of these functions would happen without the proper design and configuration of the space. Technology integration and the actual room environment  are essential considerations when designing an optimal meeting space. As stated by Tim Hennen, SVP of Engineering at IVCi, “An audio visual integrated room is a meld of art and science. The art is in the design of the room itself; the lighting, furniture, and the selection of the right technologies that will eventually come together. The science comes in with the building of those technology connections and making each device work together as if they were one.”

That being said, there are 4 core design and technology components that are imperative when creating an effective collaboration environment. Understanding these will also help with determining what you would like to accomplish within the room.

Video
“What do you want to see?” Video in an AV room is about the display of content, how you see meeting participants on the other side of the video call,  and how remote participants see you. The equipment associated with video includes cameras, displays, a matrix switcher, a digital video processor, and a codec.

Audio
“How do you want to hear/be heard?” Audio in an AV room is about how audio is projected in the room, how sound is sent to remote participants, and how you are heard to remote participants. Equipment for audio includes speakers, microphones, acoustic panels, and an audio control system.

Control
“How do you want to control the room?” Control in an AV room is about managing what you display, where you display it, and who is heard. The equipment involved includes a control processor and the control panel.

Lighting
“How will the room be lit properly?” Lighting in an AV room is about where the lighting is placed, where current natural light sources are located, and where you want your furniture and equipment placed. Lights, shades, and lighting placement are the essentials associated with lighting in an AV room.

Understanding how these components affect the collaboration space is as important as selecting the the technology itself. Poor lighting or acoustics impact the collaboration experience just as much as not having the right video conferencing or presentation equipment. Download a copy of our AV Buyers guide for detailed explanations of each core component in addition to some handy tips and tricks.

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