Conference rooms play a major role in any organization. They’re where presentations are made, ideas are formed and innovation happens. Management teams go to discuss business strategy, work teams go to collaborate on projects, business partners go to discuss relationships, and sales representatives go to court clients. The bottom line is conference rooms are where business happens. Therefore, it is very important to consider the factors that make a space conducive to meetings.

Before designing and implementing an audio/visual integrated room it is important to take some time to consider the meeting space itself, where the room will be located in your building, and some of the key components of the room:

Location: Conference rooms should be located in low-traffic areas to minimize background distractions and maintain confidentiality. Soundproofing or speech privacy solutions can be used in busy areas to mitigate unwanted noise and preserve privacy.

Acoustics: A conference room’s acoustics ensure an optimal audio experience for both in-room and remote participants. The room’s size and shape, as well as, surface materials (walls/floor/ceiling) can lead to reverberations or echo. In some cases, noise cancellation devices may be needed to improve audio quality.

Doors & Windows: Too much direct sunlight can become uncomfortable, not to mention blinding, for participants. Additionally, glass windows and doors tend to let in more outside noise which can disrupt a meeting. Blackout shades and solid doors can be used to minimize light and background noise.

Furniture: Proper seating arrangements must be designed to provide optimal viewing and comfort for each participant. If video conferencing will be integrated, furniture should be chosen that minimizes the glare on cameras.

Power: A conference room should have a few dedicated circuits to power all equipment (displays, projectors, video conferencing, etc) along with convenient ports for participants to plug in personal devices.  There should also be enough power to handle any HVAC systems that will need to be added to the room to support larger numbers of participants.

Many of these areas of concern can be adjusted in the selected room space, However, selecting a room space that meets many of the above criteria can help to reduce costly room remediation and provide an environment that will be far more conducive to meetings.

Learn more about creating an optimal collaboration environment from our Audio Visual Buyers Guide.

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Norm here. I use video on a daily basis and absolutely love it; although, I seem to make a lot of mistakes which can be rather embarrassing at times. Out of the goodness of my heart, I’m sharing some of these instances so you can avoid making the same mistakes.

Well yesterday I had a little snafu during my presentation to a client. I got caught up chatting with a co-worker and was running a little late. I had just enough time to join the video call but figured it was okay since I could just connect my laptop and get the presentation set up during the first few minutes.

So, I’m in the middle of catching up with the client on their weekend plans and all of a sudden this ear-piercing noise starts coming from the table. I look down and, you know that little thing that pops out of the table so you can you can share content from your PC, it was possessed!!

It would rise up and then get stuck and start buzzing really loud. When I pushed it down the buzzing stopped but then the stupid thing started raising up again. It was a vicious cycle I tell you! I hit mute so the client’s ear drums wouldn’t blow out but I can only imagine what I looked like trying to fix this thing. Mute just doesn’t work on video like it works on audio.

Anyway, I finally gave up and “accidentally” disconnected the call. Then I called our helpdesk to come investigate the issue (because our entire office could hear it) while I located a free conference room to reconnect to the call. After that I was able to continue without a hitch, but the meeting started 15 minutes late. I apologized profusely but I could tell the client was a little agitated.

After the meeting I tracked down Rob to find out what happened. Apparently a paperclip got stuck in the laptop computer interface causing it to jam when it rose up and produce that obnoxious sound. I just looked at Rob with disbelief. A paper clip, seriously?!? I just don’t understand why this stuff has to happen to me.

At any rate, I learned a valuable lesson today. It’s called stop dilly-dallying and get yourself set up ahead of time!

Norm here. I use video on a daily basis and absolutely love it; although, I seem to make a lot of mistakes which can be rather embarrassing at times. Out of the goodness of my heart, I’m sharing some of these instances so you can avoid making the same mistakes. 

Yesterday, I was in the conference room for our monthly sales meeting. We were discussing the latest market trends when this new guy appears on the screen to give his thoughts. Now, not only did this guy have long blonde hair, he had his shirt unbuttoned a little too far if you know what I mean. 

So I lean over and whisper to Carl, who does this guy think he is Fabio? When I turn back, I saw a few people snickering and Dan (aka Fabio) had a really weird look on his face.

I thought to myself, could they have heard me? No way, they’re thousands of miles away and I was just whispering to Carl.  Maybe they read my lips? That seems highly unlikely – although Fabio is pretty distinct. 

Later that day, my manager calls me into his office to discuss my ‘inappropriate comment.’  Uh oh – busted. Turns out, microphones are super sensitive and can pick up even the slightest sound. Even though I was whispering, the microphone picked up my comments for every single person to hear. 

Note to self: Whispering is not really whispering on a video call.  

Anyway, the next day I called Dan over video to apologize for my behavior. I told him that sometimes I speak without really thinking and he was cool about it. He said perhaps I was just jealous because he could pull off the look and I couldn’t.  Right, that’s it.

iPads are everywhere! Enterprise. Education. Not-for-profit. The place I get burritos…

Due to the iPad explosion, more and more organizations are looking to create iPad  applications that can help run their business. IVCi’s team of AV gurus has taken it one step further, creating an iPad application that can actually run your conference room or boardroom. Through some clever programing and a deep understanding of AV technologies, it is now possible to control every aspect of an AV integrated room from the touch screen of the iPad. Need to adjust the lighting or shades? No problem!

Video conferencing has begun encompassing everything you would expect from a standard, face-to-face board room meeting and Polycom has even managed to integrate digital whiteboards in to its offering. The firm hopes that this final addition will make its unified communications technology a well-rounded solution that will appeal to practically all businesses.

 
The inclusion of whiteboard capabilities comes after video conferencing specialists raced to integrate as many disparate technologies as possible – including video sharing, document collaboration and PowerPoint solutions – into an all-encompassing offering. Speaking to Information Week, John Antanaitis, vice president of product marketing at Polycom, said: “The last thing in the room that we were never able to connect was the whiteboard.”

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