Infocomm, the largest industry tradeshow for all things communications, was held earlier this month. The show focuses on audio visual technology including the technologies that are used to build collaborative room environments.  Major visual collaboration vendors also setup large booths to showcase and demo their recent offerings to the public and their partners. This year, a trend that we have consistently been seeing in video came to fruition.

In a previous post, we discussed the move of video conferencing to software and virtualization. At the show this year, a plethora of products were announced that follow this exact model. Rather than provide a breakdown of every company and their new solutions, let’s take a look at the common themes throughout all of the announcements.

Software Based
Each new product and solution that was announced was entirely software based. What does that mean? Gone are the days of specialized hardware or DSPs that are purpose built for a particular video conferencing application. Instead, manufacturers are writing software that can either be loaded on off- the-shelf servers or deployed on virtual servers. A significant benefit to this trend is increased scalability, can easily add or delete users without having to purchase more hardware. Not only does this help reduce the costs associated with video it allows more people to access to the technology.

It’s About Collaboration
Video conferencing vendors are beginning to recognize that simply meeting via video isn’t enough. The need for users to collaborate with others on documents and deliverables is growing in importance. Nearly all of the software based announcements included features around content sharing, annotation and white boarding and even the ability to store perpetual notes in a virtual room that can be revisited. These features will elevate video from individual meetings to on-going collaborative sessions that can start and stop organically.

Go Mobile or Go Home
Not surprising, mobile devices took center stage at Infocomm and all of the video related announcements included significant functionality around them. For a short time, the ability to simply join a video meeting on your mobile device was enough. Users were blown away by the convenience of being able to join from anywhere. However, early solutions provided limited functionality for those mobile attendees. Manufacturers have realized that simply joining from a mobile device is no longer enough. End users want the ability to join, share content, control the meeting and have no restrictions based on their device. Some really exciting features include the ability to connect to meetings with multiple devices, screen share directly from a tablet or smartphone, and more.

As Far as the Eye Can See
As previously mentioned, these new software platforms are lowering the cost of implementing video across all users in an organization. Beyond that, the importance of being able to extend visual collaboration to anyone outside of the organization has become a major feature. All solutions are allowing anyone to join via a web browser, a UC client, or a myriad of other solutions currently in use. Instead of requiring uses to take special steps to join a meeting, they can join with whatever software, device, or solution they are currently utilizing.

The transition to software in collaboration is happening quickly and the latest solutions are a testament to that. With this new model, the development time for new features and support is rapidly increasing so users will have access to the latest tools as soon as they are available. It’s an exciting time for people everywhere as their ability to be connected is increasing exponentially!

The thought of implementing a new Electronic Medical Records (EMR) system is enough to make anyone in a healthcare organization wake up in a cold sweat. Switching from paper charts to an entirely new way of providing patient care is a daunting task for most physicians as it requires a brand new set of processes and procedures.

However, the benefits of EMR can no longer be ignored. Not only does storing medical records digitally help prevent filing errors, patient records can be backed up in multiple locations significantly reducing the threat of losing patient health information in an emergency. Plus, the data is accessible almost anywhere allowing physicians to view medical history and treat a patient regardless of where they are.

As a result, five leading health systems have created the Care Connectivity Consortium to pioneer the use of electronic medical records. Together, Intermountain Healthcare (based in Utah), Geisinger Health System (Pennsylvania), Group Health Cooperative (Washington), Kaiser Permanente (California), and Mayo Clinic (Minnesota) are working to develop a secure way of sharing patient information regardless of the vendor used to originally create the record.

The five healthcare systems involved have an enormous geographic reach and access to large volumes of patients. They must work together to develop, test and implement processes and procedures to quickly access and share patient information across multiple different EMR systems. Additionally, the Consortium must address how to obtain a patient’s advance consent and then store it properly to ensure it is readily accessible in the event of an emergency visit, states Todd Allen in a blog article.

Visual collaboration technologies can help connect geographically dispersed members of the Care Connectivity Consortium and enhance the collaboration experience. Audio visual integrated rooms designed to support complex data allow participants to share multiple forms of content from multiple sources. Therefore, members participating in collaboration sessions can view different EMR interfaces side by side along with other data to help advance the EMR process.

These collaboration rooms can also be used within different areas in the health systems. For example, operations staff can meet to discuss best practices around EMR and other hospital operations. Roundtable sessions can also be conducted by connecting medical specialists and allowing them to discuss recent findings, best practices and treatment options.

Once the Care Connectivity Consortium has created an effective process, the organization can utilize collaboration solutions to train physicians, administrators and other staff members through recorded Video on Demand sessions. Embedded video clients can then allow anyone with questions to connect via video to an EMR specialist and receive clarification. Furthermore, embedding video solutions in the EMR system itself would allow doctors or nurses to connect with a patient’s primary physician.

As a mother of three very accident prone children, I have been to the Emergency Room in Intermountain Healthcare’s network. There is a small peace of mind in knowing that when we arrive, my child’s entire medical history will be available with just a click of a mouse. I applaud the Care Connectivity Consortium for their effort in advancing Electronic Medical Records and hope that one day mothers across the country are able to experience these same benefits.

You’ve likely heard a lot about collaboration lately. Collaboration is now considered an integral part of corporate innovation and success. According to this study by IBM, the CEOs of top companies all give collaboration skills top billing for driving firms’ achievements:

“CEOs regard interpersonal skills of collaboration (75 percent), communication (67 percent), creativity (61 percent) and flexibility (61 percent) as key drivers of employee success to operate in a more complex, interconnected environment.”

Choosing a “Collaborative Architecture”
But what trips up a lot of companies’ leadership is not whether they should create a collaborative environment, but how to do it. According to this Harvard Business Review article, companies are often in such a rush to implement collaboration that little, if any, thought is put into the nuts and bolts:

“All too often firms jump into relationships without considering their structure and organizing principles—what we call the collaborative architecture,” write article authors Gary Pisano and Roberto Verganti. They’ve come up with a method to identify the best strategy for your company, which begins with these key questions:

“Given your strategy, how open or closed should your firm’s network of collaborators be? And who should decide which problems the network will tackle and which solutions will be adopted?”

To help you create such a structure, here are some tips to create a healthy and productive collaboration project.

7 Tips to Help Build a Better Collaboration:

  1. Move from individual idea-generation to a group, and then back to solo work.
  2. Mix virtual and in-person meetings, if possible, and use a variety of methods that will give attendees visuals and important cues, like body language.
  3. Create a great physical space that’s comfortable, encourages participation and fosters great ideas.
  4. Keep your supporting documents and files organized.
  5. Use a mix of technologies to create a virtual collaboration environment, including integrating mobile components to adapt to the increase in mobile application use.
  6. Keep collaboration groups small and fix a beginning and an end to a collaboration project to avoid overwhelming participants and scope creep.
  7. Create collaboration events, like 3M does for its employees from different divisions to get innovation happening.

Choose Your Tools Wisely:

  • Online: You can look to a product that designed for collaboration, like 37Signals Basecamp or Teambox. As the value of collaboration has become more recognized, the amount of programs designed for collaborative projects has kept pace, so test drive a few to find the best fit.
  • Video: Video conferencing technology has improved to the point that great visuals, complex data, and real-time performance mean long distance collaborations are no longer second rank to in-person meetings.
  • Social: Take a look at WebEx Social, which is a social network for corporations. Some companies are exploring ways to use Pinterest, which now has business accounts, and Google can be a good tool as well.
  • In-person: Maybe you agree with Yahoo’s Marissa Mayer that physical presence leads to better ideas, in which case create areas around your office that will foster exchange. Google likes communal areas, as does Etsy, because cubicles kill creativity.

Interested in learning more about how your company can collaborate its way to success? Contact IVCi to discuss the best collaboration solution for your needs.

Now that unified communications have become commonplace and popular, many meeting participants prefer to participate in meetings from their desk. In some instances, that might work well, but in-room collaboration offers benefits that completely remote meetings do not. In-room allows participants to experience non-verbal communication and other visual cues that make collaboration more effective. Participants can get up and move around and still participate in the conversation, plus larger displays make it easier to view remote participants and data sources.

Organizations also often need to share and collaborate on complex data. This includes high resolution images where granular detail is necessary, such as blueprints or products designs, as well as the ability to display and control data from multiple sources simultaneously. In these cases, desktop collaboration just doesn’t quite cut it. Much of the detail and interactivity common among complex data can get lost over the desktop, plus users typically have to choose between sharing video or sharing content.

The solution is a collaboration room designed to support telepresence capabilities and complex data equally. A few application and teams that can benefits from these types of rooms include:

Research Teams: Participants need to view multiple images and different types of research data while on a video call.
Crisis Management: War Rooms that need multiple, high resolution video feeds to stay on top of the situation as well as collaborate with remote colleagues and teams.
Product Management & Development: Ability to view large, high-resolution design images along with 360-design previews

Cyviz is a manufacturer of a range of Collaboration Telepresence (CTP) products that support complex data and aims to bring the three essentials of modern meetings into alignment: video conferencing, data, and visualization. What’s also unique and valuable about Cyviz’s products is they’re all part of a cohesive portfolio designed to work together, depending on the end user’s needs. The 7 components are:

  1. Displaywall: 5 models available
  2. User Interface: Cyviz Display Controller central room control
  3. CTP Engine: for data management; 3 models available
  4. Video Codec: for standard C1 set-up
  5. Integration Kit: all the accessories needed to put the system together
  6. Collaboration Platform: enabling multi-room connection capabilities
  7. Furniture Module: ergonomically designed unit for each product

The product range is broad enough for most CTP situations, and their products are very adaptable and user-friendly. If you’re in need of a high-quality data visual data and conference solution get in touch and we will walk you through the options to ensure you’ll collaborate efficiently and not miss a byte of crucial information.

Meet the New IVCi!

May 8th, 2013 | Posted by Adam Kaiser in Industry News | IVCi - (0 Comments)

Meet the New IVCi

There is fundamental shift going on in the world of visual communications and collaboration. With the advent of mobile devices and the cloud, a day doesn’t go by where a manufacturer doesn’t announce a new video or collaboration service or offering. At the same time, major manufacturers are pushing their technology (mostly at the desktop) as the be all end all for collaboration. However, we believe collaboration is much bigger than that and can happen anywhere.

BrandLaunchIVCi has always focused on trying to deliver the best solutions to address the business needs of our customers. We begin every engagement with a thorough assessment and understanding of our customer’s goals. This is something we have done for quite some time and the result is a solution that can deliver the desired outcomes.

With that we are incredibly excited to introduce you to our new brand. With over 18 years of experience, we have witnessed the power of collaboration and its ability to help our customers move their business forward.  Our new brand is focused 100% on collaboration. We believe when organizations embrace collaboration across their workforce, something truly remarkable occurs. Individuals come together with common goals and their collective power can accomplish far greater things than each individual on their own.

This new brand is just the beginning. Our mission is to enable our customers to improve their business and their bottom line by unleashing the collective power of their people through collaboration. As a collaboration company, IVCi will bring many new and exciting products and services to the market. As a collaboration company, we will help organizations work together in new and exciting ways. As a collaboration company, we will change the game.