As we embark on another school year, many colleges and universities are working feverishly on an engaging curriculum that will prepare students for the fast paced and ever changing “real world” they will enter upon graduation.

With video conferencing becoming a staple in today’s business environment, it’s really no surprise that the country’s leading business schools are investing in the technology. Video-enabled classrooms not only introduce students to the technology but allow them to interact with people they otherwise wouldn’t have access to.

Remote campuses can connect two video enabled classrooms; allowing enhanced collaboration and group discussions. For example, a classroom in New York could connect with a classroom in India or Japan to discuss globalization or world economics creating a unique learning experience for all participants involved.

These classrooms also allow distinguished professors to reach a larger group of students. A leader in economics or biology can teach the same class at two locations without having to commute across the state or country. As a result, students have access to a wider range of classes that can contribute to a well-rounded education.

Additionally, many business leaders and subject matter experts are scattered around the globe making it difficult for colleges or universities to arrange guest lecturers or panel discussions. It can take up to two or three business days for guest speakers to travel to campus plus delays or last minute commitments can disrupt plans and potentially cancel the event.

A virtual lecture hall creates a forum for students to interact with presenters in a way similar to a traditional lecture hall. Question and answer sessions are seamless through push-to-talk microphones that zoom up on the speaker when activated. Remote participants are able to clearly see and hear the speaker, sometimes better than a traditional room due to the cameras.

The only difference is a guest lecturer can connect from a telepresence system anywhere in the world; whether it’s at their office, university or a public room near the last minute business meeting they had to travel to. Not only does this eliminate time consuming and expensive travel, it drastically reduces the potential of a last-minute cancellation.

See  a virtual lecture hall in action below!

Additional Resources:
Virtual Collaboration Room Brochure
Custom Telepresence Solutions

Students in the U.S. are learning about other cultures though video conferencing technology. Children who live through tragedies like earthquakes and other current events are sharing their experiences with American children, and all are growing from the experience.

Across the United States, students are teaming up with classrooms around the world, using video conferencing equipment, social media, and other technologies to learn about current events, historic milestones, economic trends, and cultural norms.

Educators say the collaborations, which lend themselves to co-curricular projects, foster deep and meaningful conversations, whet a thirst for knowledge that textbooks cannot offer, and show that people in different countries have a lot more in common than many assume.

http://www.edweek.org/ew/articles/2012/01/23/19el-globallearning.h31.html?tkn=QRXFXMQkiSoybAh7Ob6dGGZvWbU1%2Bi2kMpPL&cmp=clp-edweek&utm_source=fb&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=mrss

 

According to a recent study by Polycom, more teachers are aware of the power of video conferencing technology and an increasing number want to use it to enhance communication.

More than three-quarters of British teachers would like access to video conferencing technology so they can have digital meetings with pupils, their parents and colleagues when face-to-face meetings are not possible. The driving force behind demand for the technology appears to be its ability to increase engagement.

http://www.conferencingnews.com/news/40354

 

A video conference on Sept. 9 linked youth voices from the United States, Lebanon, India and the United Kingdom. Small children when the attacks occurred in 2001, the participants are now high school and college students actively engaged in seeking understanding and respect across faiths, beliefs and cultures.

This was not a one-off event. All of the participating schools are part of a new initiative called “Face to Faith” — an international schools program sponsored by the Tony Blair Faith Foundation currently active in more than 400 schools in 17 nations. Through video conferencing and online community, students ages 12-17 communicate directly with their peers around the world. They are able to address issues of global concern through civil dialogue with one another about their beliefs, values, attitudes and faiths.

More here:

http://www.firstamendmentcenter.org/beyond-911-horror-voices-for-the-future

 

IVCi created a custom design for Duke University’s Fuqua School of Business using Cisco’s TelePresence technology. The results are remarkable.

Read the full story here:

http://www.ivci.com/video-conferencing-case-study-duke.html