With the technology used in telepsychiatry becoming more reliable, inexpensive, and ubiquitous, there has been a corresponding increase in mental health professionals who are turning to remote treatments. In fact, psychiatry has been at the forefront of telemedicine use.

The general consensus thus far is that telepsychiatry is particularly useful for rural populations, children, the military, and those in institutions like prisons. In other words, telepsychiatry reaches people who otherwise wouldn’t have access to mental health services. (There is a severe shortage of child and adolescent psychiatrists). Telepsychiatry can also lessen some of the barriers often cited to obtaining mental health treatment, including cultural, shame, cost, and distance.

Many states, often in conjunction with state university medical and public health departments, have recently initiated telepsychiatry programs. The South Carolina Department of Mental Health established a program in 2007 to provide telepsychiatry in state hospital emergency departments. Also in 2007, University of Alabama’s College of Community of Health Sciences joined the Alabama Department of Mental Health (and others) to launch a telepsychiatry program, focusing on rural populations. New York State’s Office of Mental Health runs the New York Consultation and Telepsychiatry Program (NYCaT) aimed at children, and last fall West Virginia University’s WVU Healthcare received a government grant that will cover four years of telepsychiatry programs for an addiction treatment clinic. The Centers for American Indian and Alaska Native Health at the Colorado School of Public Health also run a telehealth program that includes mental health services.

That’s just a handful of examples, but they demonstrate the range of applications and growth of telepsychiatry. While the interest and investment is there, acceptance is by no means guaranteed. Here are five potential obstacles to telepsychiatry adoption.

Cost: States vary greatly in their definitions, approach, and regulation to telehealth (or telemedicine) according to a recent report from the Center for Connected Health Policy, State Telehealth Laws and Reimbursement Policies. While the majority of states reimburse telehealth through Medicaid; some do not, including Connecticut, Iowa, Massachusetts, New Hampshire, New Jersey, and Rhode Island, plus the District of Columbia. Amongst those that do reimburse, there is a wide range of what and who is reimbursed, and when.

Privacy: “Increased video-conferencing over public networks also creates the potential for unauthorized access to protected health information.” This is from a recent article in Current Psychiatry. The authors’ recommendations: use VPNs and encryption; train health professions in data storage and telemedicine ethics.

Legal: A provider must be licensed in every state they provide care. So a health care provider in one state that is conducting a telepsychiatry session with a client in another means they must be licensed in both states. There are 9 states, however, where the medical boards have instituted special telehealth certifications. As telemedicine becomes more common, look for this issue to become a hot topic.

Habits: Old habits die hard, and not every mental health care provider sees the value of telepsychiatry, or wants to invest the resources in training and adopting new modes of treatment. A study by the California HealthCare Foundation, which focused on telepsychiatry adoption in 7 emergency departments, found that in every case, there were initial problems getting support from involved parties, including doctors, nurses, and psychiatrists. From the study: “Some of the spoke sites felt that they had neither the time nor the energy to devote to telemedicine efforts.”

Lack of training or incorrect training: “Training is critical,” writes Mark Vanderwerf in his chapter Ten Critical Steps for a Successful Telemedicine Program. He recommends “layered” training, that is, training presented in progressive stages, and it should be formal to increase its perceived value. For the first level, he suggests course materials, a syllabus, registration, and testing, and even a certificate awarded to those who pass the course. The second layer includes on-site evaluations, and the third includes support and “refresher sessions.”

Boeing’s much anticipated 787 Dreamliner encountered a laundry list of problems which eventually led to the grounding of many of the planes. There are several different theories as to what went wrong and Boeing could have done better. Many have to do with the decision to embrace outsourcing and overall lack of supply chain management.

In a recent Forbes article, Jonathan Salem Baskin is quoted “It didn’t help that the outsourcing plan included skipping the detailed blueprints the company would have normally prepared, and allowing vendors to come up with their own. Delivered components arrived with instructions and notes written in Chinese, Italian, and other languages.”

With the plethora of video conferencing and visual collaboration technologies available it’s surprising that Boeing had this many issues coordinating and communicating with their remote teams. While we can’t know for sure exactly what went wrong or what Boeing did or did not do; we can offer some suggestions as to how organizations can utilize collaboration solutions to their fullest extend and help ensure a seamless supply chain.

A UC solution is a must to connect internal team members assigned to the project. These solutions can even allow approved external team members, such as suppliers, to connect easily. Features such as instant messaging (IM), screen and document sharing, and video conferencing are key components to keeping the lines of communication open. For example, if a supplier has a quick question about the design, he can quickly IM a team member asking the question or if the person is available for a quick chat. Quick video conferences or even formal meetings with video and document sharing can help ensure consistency and reliability among suppliers.

For more crucial aspects of the manufacturing process, such as discussing blueprints and inspecting components, an immersive visual collaboration solution that includes Datapresence (ability to see multiple sources of data) is necessary. Simply showing a single document while the video participants are minimized on screen will not provide the collaboration experience necessary for such critical aspects of the manufacturing process.

Solutions like Oblong or Cyviz combine video conferencing with the ability to share multiple steams of data in real time creating a true collaboration environment. Team members would be able to see detailed designs and prototypes of the outsourced components in addition to the supplier’s team. Both teams would then be able to communicate, give and receive feedback, and discuss any potential issues. By repeating this process with all suppliers, the organization can help ensure consistency among components. They can also connect and facilitate collaboration between the supplier of Component A which connects into Component B from a separate supplier.

Supply chain management is one of the most complicated aspects of any organization as it relies heavily on communication and coordination between two or more parties. By underestimating the importance of communication, an organization can run into problems similar to the ones Boeing faced. On the other hand, by providing both internal and external (supplier) team members with the tools and opportunity to effectively communicate and collaborate and organization can successfully manage all aspects of its supply chain.

Did you know that NASA, home to astronauts, rovers, and space shuttles, also offers a comprehensive program of free Science, Technology, Engineering, and Mathematics (STEM) courses for students across the U.S.?

NASA’s Digital Learning Network (DLN) reached almost 76,000 students last year using video and web conferencing from one of their 10 studios. Caryn Smith Long , manager of DLN, explains how the innovative program helps to broaden students’ learning—and worlds.

IVCi: Who uses NASA’s DLN?
CSL: We work with students from kindergarten through certified teachers. We’re developing some asynchronous courses where we take some modules we offer classrooms and teach them to teachers so they’re able to do the same offerings with their students. Our calendars get really full really quick, so this gives them the opportunity to learn the material and do the module themselves in the classroom.

IVCi: What are the benefits of the program and video learning?
CSL: There are a variety of different benefits. I was a teacher for 16 years and I tried to give kids a chance to see beyond their own limited backyard so they could see a future for themselves. Video conferencing provides them with the technology that allows students to see beyond their own world.

When kids hear they’re going to be connecting with NASA, it automatically generates excitement just because of the branding. The meatball, the little blue insignia, is second (behind Coca-Cola) in terms of international recognition.

We’ve done some research on the effectiveness of video conferencing and have found that integrating inquiry presentation within video conferencing is indeed an effective way to have students learn. It’s actually a more effective way to learn the content when you’re being interactive and the students have supplies on their end and you’re facilitating that through a process of questioning.

IVCi: Are there any challenges with using video, especially regarding schools’ access to technology and equipment?
CSL: Initially, there were issues. Video conferencing equipment was very expensive. You could spend anywhere from $10,000 to $25,000 for a complete system and a lot of school systems didn’t have that money. Originally that was the only way we could connect with them because it was consistent in quality for both audio and video. But over the years, web conferencing has become more stable and reliable. We have web conferencing software that allows schools to connect via webcams on their computers directly to our video conferencing units. We’ve also used Skype software solutions. So opening up that door has made us more accessible to schools.

IVCi: Have you seen an audience growth due to this increased accessibility?
CSL: Yes, I think so. We have about a 20% growth and I anticipate even more growth at the end of this fiscal year.

IVCi: Which are the most popular programs?
CSL: Our Magnificent Sun seems to be really popular with our elementary students. Planet Hopping is another one, and States of Matter, and Roving on Mars with Curiosity. This one’s been revamped to include the ongoing research Curiosity is doing on the Red Planet.

IVCi: Are there any particular challenges with keeping students engaged when using video conferencing?
CSL: When you first start with these programs and the kids aren’t used to it, they’re all amazed the TV is talking back to them. But eventually the technology becomes transparent so it’s as if you’re in the classroom with them and they begin to realize we can see them. Sometimes I can see the entire classroom with video conferencing better than I can in the actual classroom because you have a different perspective. We try to personalize it as well. We ask for the kids’ names, and that forms a relationship.

IVCi: What are some of the most memorable questions you’ve heard from students?
CSL: The funniest questions they ask are astronaut related: How do you go to the bathroom in space, how do you sleep, how do you eat? When we open the session up at the end for questions, 9 times out of 10, we’ll get those three.

IVCi: Can you share some of your favorite moments?
CSL: Not only have I had the chance to work with astronauts, which is way cool, but I’ve also met the Tuskegee Airmen. We had author Chris Van Allsburg in our studios to talk about his book Zathura and about myths and realities of space travel. We had a chance to celebrate NASA’s 50th birthday. We had a big web cast where we did a NASA love-fest and connected all day long to each of the 10 NASA centers and each did a special presentation for U.S. schools, but we also did schools internationally that day.

IVCi: What’s your favorite part of NASA’s DLN program?
CSL: Knowing that we’re impacting more than just 30 students in a classroom. We’ve connected with hundreds of thousands during the year and we’ve inspired them to maybe look beyond their own situations and get excited about science and mathematics. To know that, as an educator, you have that kind of impact with that many students, that’s why you go into education.

CarynBlogCaryn Long is Lead Education Specialist for NASA’s Digital Learning Network. She is a 25-year career educator and former elementary classroom educator currently pursuing her PhD in Educational Technology at Oklahoma State University. She resides in Newport News, VA with her significant other and two young sons.

A few weeks ago I had to privilege to play with one of Oblong’s Mezzanine systems and it was hands down one of the coolest things I have ever seen. Mezzanine truly pushes the boundaries of collaboration to the next level by creating a shared workspace across multiple displays. Essentially, anyone connected to the network can push and control content from multiple inputs on just about any device imaginable.

I was using my iPad, another person was on his PC and another was using Oblong’s spatial wand (think Wii remote but so much cooler). We were all able to push contend from our device, move things around on different screens and “pin” documents to digital corkboards.

Why does this matter?

Well think about a meeting where collaboration is critical; such as research and development, business or financial market analytics or product marketing and design. In each of these meetings, a simple PowerPoint presentation or word document will not suffice. For product launch meetings, participants need to see design specs, cost projections, target markets, key messaging and more.

With Mezzanine, all of these documents can be displayed simultaneously and managed in real time! Market research information can be displayed on one screen with remote participants on another while the team collectively brainstorms on product messaging or market segmenting on the whiteboard. The applications are simply endless which is what makes this solution so amazing.

Watch the video below for a quick demonstration as words simply cannot do Mezzanine justice!

IVCi and Oblong will also be hosting an event on Thursday, March 7 at 5PM at Oblong NYC. Participants will be able to meet the team, grab a drink, and experience the future of collaboration for themselves. Space is limited, click here to register.

See the future of enterprise communications, listen to thought leaders and comprehensive analysis, attend in-depth technical sessions, and of course stop by Booth #330 to visit IVCi!

Enterprise Connect (formerly VoiceCon) is the premiere event and exhibition for all things enterprise communications and collaboration. Sessions cover areas from Unified Communications to Video Conferencing to Social Media.

Some of the sessions we are most excited about are Building a UC & Collaboration Roadmap, Building a UC Business Case and Emerging Video Technologies. Click here to view the entire conference schedule as there are a lot of great sessions.

In other exciting news, we just found out the UC Room was selected as a finalist for the Best of Enterprise Connect! The Judging Committee reviewed over 40 entries and selected six finalists based on products with the most significant technical impact, helping to revolutionize the enterprise communications industry.

The winner is going to be announced during the Keynote speech on Wednesday, March 20 at the Gaylord Palms Convention Center in Orlando, Florida.

We would obviously love to see you there so we’re passing along a special offer!

Save 40% off the on-site price for the Entire Event and Tue-Thu Conference Packages or register for a Free Expo Pass with Priority Code EIIVCI.

*Photo courtesy of Enterprise Connect 2012