Video has traditionally been viewed as complicated with a wide range of phrases that many don’t understand. It seems as though every day there are new terms and buzzwords being used in the video industry that make keeping up and mastering the technology very difficult at times.

With the rise of video conferencing popularity understanding some of these terms is imperative in choosing the right solution.

Here are 10 of the most common terms and their definitions:

1. Endpoint: The physical equipment or software used to make a video connection. They can be in the form of a room based system, desktop client, or a mobile device.

2. Content Sharing: Showing your desktop or specific content such as power point presentation, word or excel documents, pictures etc.

3. Point to point call: Communication between two endpoints. This is in contrast to a multipoint call where there are three or more connections on the call.

4. Multipoint Call: Communication between 3 or more connections. Multipoint calls connect using either a hardware or a cloud based bridge.

5. Firewall Traversal: Technology that creates a secure path through the firewall. This enables traffic from an organizations internal network to internet at large.

6. Interoperability: The ability for systems to work together. With video this means different endpoints being able to connect together for a video call.

7. Room based systems: Portable or non-portable dedicated systems with all the required components for a video call. This usually includes a camera, codec, control computer and all electrical interfaces. Typically, microphones and a display will connect to the system as well.

8. Streaming: A Method of relaying data (video) over a computer network as a steady continuous stream, and allowing playback to proceed while subsequent data is being received.

9. H.323: A standard video protocol that manufacturers use that allow their systems to speak the same language. It controls audio and video signals, bandwidth, and call control.

10. SIP: A video protocol designed to enable the communication and connection of devices across networks. This is an older protocol that was designed more for closed systems that would ultimately connect via gateways to other closed systems.

Social collaboration is about the casual interactions among colleagues, business partners and even customers that enable creativity and drive innovation.  When an organization embraces social collaboration, interactions come alive and innovation can explode across the business!

We created the below Infographic to illustrate the power of social collaboration and the innovation that is possible when people are given the tools and environment to work together.

After you take a look at the Infographic, read our new white paper: Driving Innovation Through Social Collaboration.

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Welcome to our bi-weekly recap of the week’s best articles surrounding collaboration.

1. Working Smarter: The Paradigm Shift in Business Collaboration

Great insight on how individuals embracing new collaboration tools will benefit from a more innovative, efficient, and happier workforce. In contrast to past work environments, these new disruptive forces in collaboration technologies have created new strategies for companies to implement.

2. Fufulling the promise of advanced collaboration 

Although the advanced collaboration technologies emerging in our market today are increasing productivity, there have been many IT challenges along the way. One of the most difficult hurdles for implementing these tools is the lack of an open standards-based development framework.

3. Collaboration and the future of Customer Support 

Understanding the changing nature of customer support is imperative for organizations looking to increase productivity and customer approval rates. This new wave of collaborative support is strongly tied to the mobile revolution, with the addition of social options alongside traditional phone support.

4. Five tips to ace your next video conference from anywhere 

With the rise in popularity of video conferencing, particularly mobile video, these are some important tips to remember when conducting your next video call. These include practice, position, appearance, attention and mute/disconnect.

5. Web Conferencing: Need for Today’s Business World 

With the increasing mobile workforce, the need for high quality collaborative technologies is very important for productivity. Web conferencing in particular allows individuals to connect and join a meeting any time and any place.

Advancements in video technology have had a tremendous impact on the creation and proliferation of distance learning programs. By integrating video conferencing solutions, universities are able to extend the reach of their programs to students who otherwise wouldn’t be able to attend. Calvin Hughes, Instructional Technologist at the University of Nebraska Medical Center, talks about his experience with video conferencing and the impact it has had on the University.

IVCi: Can you give us a brief overview of your video environment?
CH: We currently have 5 classrooms that hook up locally at the College of Dentistry. There are also 6 or 7 locations across the state that have Cisco telemedicine carts for tele-dentistry purposes. We started the Dental Hygiene [distance learning] program in 2003 for the West division which currently graduates four students each year. There are currently about 50 hours of classes a week that are transmitted out to the West region. In 2010 we expanded into telemdecine carts.

IVCi: How do you connect local and remote students into one classroom?
CH: The main classroom has a 52” TV on the side of the wall that remote students show up on. They can hear and speak to them over speakers and portable microphones. For students in the west division, there are two screens, one with the professor and one with content, and individual monitors in front of each student.

IVCi: What were the drivers that led you to implement video?

We’re a State University with state funding and Nebraska Medical Center and University are located on the Eastern side of the state. There are some community colleges on the Western side that have nursing programs but nothing with dental programs. We have a duty to try and get dental students out in the field on the Western side which is less populated. If students are doing classes out there, they are more likely to stay and practice out there.

IVCi: What has been the end user (professor/student) reaction to video?

CH: Everyone is pretty open minded about it. We don’t have a problem getting students or filling up the distance classes. Remote students aren’t always as eager to answer questions sometimes but the instructors are good about making sure they participate by asking them questions directly.

IVCi: Can you point to any specific metrics that have been influenced by video?

CH: We graduate four students a year from the hygiene program and that’s four students who might not have gotten their degree.

IVCi: What was your favorite moment using video?

CH: The first tele-dentisry consult was very exciting. We put a lot of work in getting those telemedicine carts in and around the state. The Western part of the state is under populated and under-served by dentists and we wanted to reduce a patient’s drive time when needing to see a specialist. The carts are spread out across the state and allow for easier access to specialists. The initial consultation can be handled over video and a specialist can determine if patients need to come to their office or if their local dentist can fix the problem.

IVCi: Do you have any advice for universities implementing video for the first time?

First, have a good support group of people who want to push the technology. These people can be very valuable when implementing the solution. Also, most of our programs have been grant funded and it’s been hard moving away from the grant funding to be able to upgrade the technology ourselves. Have a plan in place for updates and replacement costs so that funding is in place when the time comes.

As stated in Part 1 of this series, when choosing to deploy a mobile video strategy, having a plan of attack is of utmost importance. The first step was defining the video environment to determine what is necessary for a successful implementation. The second step in developing a mobile video strategy is to assess different aspects of the organization’s network environment. This focuses on the following key areas:

  • Office Network
  • Remote Network
  • Infrastructure
  • Platform Consideration
  • Active Directory Integration

Specifically, this means that attention needs to be paid to an office’s wireless network configuration, remote network essentials, defined software platforms, necessary infrastructure, and determination of active directory integration.

For example, it is imperative to understand potential bandwidth consumption so as to prepare the network with adequate bandwidth capacity. Implementing a mobile video strategy can cause an explosion of bandwidth usage, which can be crippling to a network if not adjusted properly. Understanding these necessary steps when preparing a network for mobile video will help to ensure an effective and successful implementation.

Download our network considerations guide to get started with planning your mobile video strategy.

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